The Literary Snob

Ask me anything   All of My Reviews   About Me   My Goodreads Account   Books Read in 2014   Books Read in 2013   Books Read in 2012   Books Read in 2011   

"A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say." Italo Calvino

Read the Printed Word!

alittlebookthief:

koujakuandthediamonds:

the worst is when you’re reading a really good book that follows multiple characters’ stories and you love it 90% of the time until it periodically switches back to that one character’s story that you just could not care less about and it’s like an entire chapter of internal groaning while waiting for the plot to switch back to a character you actually care about

image

I’m looking at you Brienne of Tarth.

(via booksandhotchocolate)

— 21 hours ago with 104947 notes
"Curiosity is the lust of the mind."
Thomas Hobbes (via wordsnquotes)

(via theitchofliterature)

— 1 week ago with 1525 notes
55 Words to Describe Someone’s Voice

writinghelpers:

I was sitting on the computer last night trying to be productive and actually write something. My first sentence included the character listening to a voice through an intercom and my first thought was, “What kind of voice is it?” 

So, naturally, I found myself googling the different ways to describe a voice. I present to you my findings! I hope you all find it useful. 

  • adenoidal (adj): if someone’s voice is adenoidal, some of the sound seems to come through their nose
  • appealing (adj): an appealing look/voice shows that you want help, approval, or agreement
  • breathy (adj): with loud breathing noises
  • brittle (adj): if you speak in a brittle voice, you sound as if you are about to cry
  • croaky (adj): if someone’s voice sounds croaky, they speak in a low, rough voice that sounds as if they have a sore throat
  • dead (adj): if someone’s eyes or voice are dead, they feel or show no emotion
  • disembodied (adj): a disembodied voice comes from someone who you cannot see
  • flat (adj): spoken in a voice that does not go up and down; this word is often used for describing the speech of people from a particular region

Read More

(via writingmusings)

— 1 week ago with 34472 notes
"Fantasy is silver and scarlet, indigo and azure, obsidian veined with gold and lapis lazuli. Reality is plywood and plastic, done up in mud brown and olive drab. Fantasy tastes of habaneros and honey, cinnamon and cloves, rare red meat and wines as sweet as summer. Reality is beans and tofu, and ashes at the end. Reality is the strip malls of Burbank, the smokestacks of Cleveland, a parking garage in Newark. Fantasy is the towers of Minas Tirith, the ancient stones of Gormenghast, the halls of Camelot. Fantasy flies on the wings of Icarus, reality on Southwest Airlines. Why do our dreams become so much smaller when they finally come true?

We read fantasy to find the colors again, I think. To taste strong spices and hear the songs the sirens sang. There is something old and true in fantasy that speaks to something deep within us, to the child who dreamt that one day he would hunt the forests of the night, and feast beneath the hollow hills, and find a love to last forever somewhere south of Oz and north of Shangri-La.

They can keep their heaven. When I die, I’d sooner go to Middle-Earth."

George R.R. Martin (via theflowershop)

The beginning of this quote from The Faces of Fantasy: “The best fantasy is written in the language of dreams. It is alive as dreams are alive, more real than real… for a moment at least… that long magic moment before we wake.”

(via hoomanao)

(Source: fourcolorfanboy, via hoomanao)

— 1 week ago with 64194 notes
What Are You Reading This Weekend?

I’m going to spend this weekend really diving into Brandon Sanderson’s second novel in The Stormlight Archive, Words of Radiance (the first book was amazing!).

What are you guys reading right now?

— 2 weeks ago with 12 notes
freshcleanfit:

In other news, this is one of my favorite Twitter happenings to date. 

freshcleanfit:

In other news, this is one of my favorite Twitter happenings to date. 

(via literatureismyutopia)

— 2 weeks ago with 70865 notes
classicpenguin:


oddismycopilot:
I love my books: Elizabeth Gaskell. If you like George Eliot, you should definitely check out Elizabeth Gaskell. A contemporary of both Eliot and Dickens, Gaskell likewise wrote about a broad swath of English society, including the working class, the plight of the poor, and labor unrest; her concern about social issues is best demonstrated in Mary Barton and North and South. I consider Wives and Daughters to be quite similar in tone and feel to Middlemarch and very nearly its equal. Cranford, although virtually plotless, is such a charming and gently humorous look at small-town life in mid-19th-century England that it ranks among my all-time fiction favorites.

Happy weekend reading, everyone!

I love North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell. It’s so underrated!

classicpenguin:

oddismycopilot:

I love my books: Elizabeth Gaskell. If you like George Eliot, you should definitely check out Elizabeth Gaskell. A contemporary of both Eliot and Dickens, Gaskell likewise wrote about a broad swath of English society, including the working class, the plight of the poor, and labor unrest; her concern about social issues is best demonstrated in Mary Barton and North and South. I consider Wives and Daughters to be quite similar in tone and feel to Middlemarch and very nearly its equal. Cranford, although virtually plotless, is such a charming and gently humorous look at small-town life in mid-19th-century England that it ranks among my all-time fiction favorites.

Happy weekend reading, everyone!

I love North and South by Elizabeth Gaskell. It’s so underrated!

— 2 weeks ago with 174 notes
NaNoWriMo Planning

Of course it has to be at 4 am when inspiration hits! Life wouldn’t have it any other way. For years I’ve kept up with my followers’ NaNoWriMo adventures and I always looked on a little envious. But I was in law school and November is when you’re suppose to buckle down and start studying for finals, so I never took the plunge.

This year’s different, I’m temporarily not in law school (I have to go back in May to quickly finish up my degree but for right now I’m free) and I’ve settled into my current job. Plus my boyfriend is really pushing me to get back into writing. There’s even a dollar bet on the line!

The problem has been finding the creativity within myself to come up with a plot. There’s been a few vague ideas that I mentally played with, but I didn’t seem able to plan a plot around them. However, rejoice for a story has finally come to me! And it came with an almost fully developed plot. I have a beginning, middle, and end. I have a three-dimensional main character with an interesting story to tell. By no means is the planning stage over; I still have all the details to hammer out and a few gaps in the plot to fill up. But it’s comforting to know I finally have something to work it, and I have enough time to plan the plot before November 1st rolls around.

Are any of you guys planning on participating in NaNoWriMo this year?

— 2 weeks ago with 4 notes
#nanowrimo 
"Writing is something you do alone. It’s a profession for introverts who wanna tell you a story but don’t wanna make eye contact while telling it"
John Green (via magicpenguin1)
— 2 weeks ago with 388 notes

misswendyd:

Gorgeous Puffin in Bloom editions illustrated by Anna Bond from Rifle Paper Company! Beautiful artwork on those endpapers and cover, plus special bonus materials at the end of each book. Including, of course, a recipe for raspberry cordial.

We’re giving away a complete set of four to one lucky person who completes our MG/YA classics challenge this year!

Photographs by The Midnight Garden.

(via ebookporn)

— 2 weeks ago with 5115 notes

I live in two worlds. One is a world of books. I’ve been a resident of Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha County, hunted the white whale aboard the Pequod, fought alongside Napoleon, sailed a raft with Huck and Jim, committed absurdities with Ignatius J. Reilly, rode a sad train with Anna Karenina and strolled down Swann’s Way. It’s a rewarding world, but my second one is by far superior. My second one is populated with characters slightly less eccentric, but supremely real, made of flesh and bone, full of love, who are my ultimate inspiration for everything.

(Source: daydreamsandwhispers, via onyearonedayonelifeoneway)

— 3 weeks ago with 718 notes
Random Book Sale: Any: Amazon.com: Books →

books-and-butterflies:

Hey everyone, 

I’m a college student and an independent seller on Amazon! I am trying to pay bills and spread my love for books. I started “Random Book Sale” on Amazon to broaden the horizon for readers. Receiving a random book in the mail will introduce you to an entire new world! 

If you don’t have the money to purchase a book right now, I would still appreciate it if you could reblog this! 

To promote my new business, I am also doing a BOOK GIVEAWAY! Want to know how to win???

1. Buy a “Random Book” for $3.25 and receive 15 entries. 

2. Buy another book from my Amazon account for 10 entries. 

3. Reblog for 5 entries each time you reblog. 

4. If you like this post, you will receive 1 entry. 

* I can only ship in the US. If demand rises, I will start shipping outside the US*

— 3 weeks ago with 7 notes