The Literary Snob

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"A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say." Italo Calvino

Read the Printed Word!

14 daunting books every man must read →

(Source: athousandbookstoread, via bookpillows)

— 1 day ago with 38 notes
"Do you realize that all great literature is all about what a bummer it is to be a human being? Isn’t it such a relief to have somebody say that?"
Kurt Vonnegut (via the22ndpilot)

(via bookpillows)

— 1 day ago with 3040 notes
Gabriel García Márquez, 1927 - 2014 →

nyrbclassics:

image

The Colombian novelist Alvaro Mutis used to tell a story about his close friend and compatriot Gabriel García Márquez, who has died aged 87. In the mid-Sixties, when the latter was writing One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), they met every evening for a drink. García Márquez would tell…

(via nouvellabooks)

— 1 day ago with 153 notes
"You are in every line I have ever read."
Charles Dickens, Great Expectations (via quoted-books)

(via groveatlanticinc)

— 1 day ago with 1444 notes
shitroughdrafts:

“The Raven” by Edgar Allen Poe. 1845.

shitroughdrafts:

“The Raven” by Edgar Allen Poe. 1845.

(via cactokaur)

— 1 day ago with 2915 notes
shitroughdrafts:

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, by J. K. Rowling. 1999.

shitroughdrafts:

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, by J. K. Rowling. 1999.

(via cactokaur)

— 1 day ago with 7945 notes
margaery:y'know some guys just cant hold their arsenic
sansa, olenna and loras:HE HAD IT COMING
— 1 day ago with 2790 notes
heykkkkatie:

amandaonwriting:

Literary Periods with a Timeline
Source for Image

I LOVEEEE THIS.
I don’t know why, but I am obsessed with the evolution of literature through history. I love love love it. Last year when I taught English 11, I was able to work closely with the American History teacher to simultaneously track lit movements with their corresponding historical framework and oh my WORD I absolutely adored it.
Fast fact: If I could ever create am English elective to teach, it would—without question—be Modernist American Literature. Swoon <3

heykkkkatie:

amandaonwriting:

Literary Periods with a Timeline

Source for Image

I LOVEEEE THIS.

I don’t know why, but I am obsessed with the evolution of literature through history. I love love love it. Last year when I taught English 11, I was able to work closely with the American History teacher to simultaneously track lit movements with their corresponding historical framework and oh my WORD I absolutely adored it.

Fast fact: If I could ever create am English elective to teach, it would—without question—be Modernist American Literature. Swoon <3

(via ebookporn)

— 3 days ago with 493 notes
mythandrists:

This is a masterpost of Gothic literature, a genre popular in the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe (and to a lesser extent in America), which combined horror, fantasy, and Romanticism. The list is organised by genre and date. All texts are public-domain and are available online via the links provided. Happy reading, and feel free to ask if there’s anything you’d like me to add.
Novels and Novellas:
Horace Walpole: The Castle of Otranto (1764)
Friedrich Schiller: The Ghost-Seer (1781)
Anne Radcliffe: The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794)
Matthew Gregory Louis: The Monk (1796)
Mary Shelley: Frankenstein (1818)
Jane Austen: Northanger Abbey (parody, 1818)
John William Polidori: The Vampyre (1819)
Charlotte Bronte: Jane Eyre (1847)
Emily Bronte: Wuthering Heights (1847)
Edgar Allen Poe: The Light-House (unfinished, 1849)
Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu: Carmilla (1872)
Robert Louis Stevenson: The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886)
Theodor Storm: The Rider on the White Horse (1888)
Oscar Wilde: The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891)
Bram Stoker: Dracula (1897)
Gaston Leroux: The Phantom of the Opera (1911)
H.P. Lovecraft: The Shadow Over Innsmouth (1936)
Short Stories:
Washington Irving: “The Legend of Sleepy Hollow" (1820)
Edgar Allen Poe: “The Fall of the House of Usher" (1839), "The Man of the Crowd" (1840), "The Masque of the Red Death" (1842), "The Pit and the Pendulum" (1842-1843), "The Tell-Tale Heart" (1843) [You can find a complete index of Poe’s works here.]
Robert W. Chambers: The King in Yellow (short story collection, 1895)
H.P. Lovecraft: “The Moon-Bog" (1926), "The Music of Erich Zann" (1922), "Herbert West - Reanimator" (1922), "The Lurking Fear" (1923), "The Rats in the Walls" (1924), "The Dunwich Horror" (1929) [You can find a complete index of Lovecraft’s works here.]
Poetry:
Samuel Taylor Coleridge: “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (1798), "Christabel" (1800)
John Keats: “La Belle Dame Sans Merci" (1819), "Isabella, or the Pot of Basil" (1820)
Edgar Allen Poe: “Lenore" (1843), "The Raven" (1845), "Annabel Lee" (1849)
Emily Bronte: “A Death-Scene" (1846), "Honour’s Martyr" (1846)

mythandrists:

This is a masterpost of Gothic literature, a genre popular in the 18th and 19th centuries in Europe (and to a lesser extent in America), which combined horror, fantasy, and Romanticism. The list is organised by genre and date. All texts are public-domain and are available online via the links provided. Happy reading, and feel free to ask if there’s anything you’d like me to add.

Novels and Novellas:

Short Stories:

Poetry:

(via bookpillows)

— 3 days ago with 3159 notes

Suzy Bishop in Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

Suzy Bishop in Moonrise Kingdom (2012)

(Source: shewillbeyourlivingend, via bookpillows)

— 4 days ago with 10449 notes
"People don’t like her because it’s the making of her, right now. When she, sometime soon in the future, becomes this person that she’s been kind of building up to, for the past three seasons, now four, then people will really begin to root for her. I think even the audience doesn’t realize she’s such a dark horse. If she acted badass and tried to kill everyone there, she would be dead by now! She’s so intelligent, and I can’t stress that enough. Courtesy is a lady’s armor. She’s using her courtesy to deceive people, and she’s using her former self as a facade, and it works so much to her advantage, because people still think she’s this naive, vulnerable, little girl, and she’s really not. She knows exactly what she’s doing. She knows what game she’s playing! And no one else does. And she’s learned from the best — Cersei, Margaery, Tyrion, Littlefinger, even Joffrey. She’s learned so much from these people, and they don’t even realize it. They’re unwittingly feeding her to become this great kind of manipulator. King’s Landing can either make or break a person, and in Sansa’s case, it’s making her."
Sophie Turner, in response to Sansa hate (x)

(Source: beyonslays, via albinwonderland)

— 4 days ago with 34809 notes
sleepystoryteller asked: What lovely blog you have! / windblownpages


Answer:

Thank you so much!

— 4 days ago