The Literary Snob

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"A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say." Italo Calvino

Read the Printed Word!

nprbooks:

Our friends at the Guardian are in the middle of a very interesting series on literary definitions, and recently Elizabeth Edmondson has taken issue with the distinction between literary and genre fiction: 

"Genre fiction" is a nasty phrase – when did genre turn into an adjective? But I object to the term for a different reason. It’s weasel wording, in that it conflates lit fic with literature. It was clever marketing by publishers to set certain contemporary fiction apart and declare it Literature – and therefore Important, Art and somehow better than other writing.

Jane Austen, she says, “never for a moment imagined she was writing Literature. Posterity decided that – not her, not John Murray, not even her contemporary readership. She wrote fiction, to entertain and to make money.”
Nine-tenths of me agrees with her.  No, more like 99/100 of me agrees with her — there’s just a tiny little Angry Nerd somewhere inside me who’s jumping up and down, stomping her tiny foot in rage and yelling at the lit-fic crowd to get off my lawn.  Anyhow, it’s a thoughtful, well-argued read, and you can see the rest of it here.
-Petra

nprbooks:

Our friends at the Guardian are in the middle of a very interesting series on literary definitions, and recently Elizabeth Edmondson has taken issue with the distinction between literary and genre fiction: 

"Genre fiction" is a nasty phrase – when did genre turn into an adjective? But I object to the term for a different reason. It’s weasel wording, in that it conflates lit fic with literature. It was clever marketing by publishers to set certain contemporary fiction apart and declare it Literature – and therefore Important, Art and somehow better than other writing.

Jane Austen, she says, “never for a moment imagined she was writing Literature. Posterity decided that – not her, not John Murray, not even her contemporary readership. She wrote fiction, to entertain and to make money.”

Nine-tenths of me agrees with her.  No, more like 99/100 of me agrees with her — there’s just a tiny little Angry Nerd somewhere inside me who’s jumping up and down, stomping her tiny foot in rage and yelling at the lit-fic crowd to get off my lawn.  Anyhow, it’s a thoughtful, well-argued read, and you can see the rest of it here.

-Petra

— 4 hours ago with 55 notes
"I want to do with you what spring does with the cherry trees."
Pablo Neruda, Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair  (via myarmisnotalilactree)

(Source: steelylaceribbon, via hoomanao)

— 2 days ago with 676 notes
"Don’t compare your Chapter 1 to someone else’s Chapter 20."
— 2 days ago with 47690 notes
"I do love second-hand books that open to the page some previous owner read oftenest."
Helene Hanff (via loveaffairwiththelibrary)

(Source: iscahmckrae, via teachingliteracy)

— 2 days ago with 734 notes
bookishcompendium:

You can’t have ‘too many’ books.

bookishcompendium:

You can’t have ‘too many’ books.

(Source: instagram.com, via bookaddict24-7)

— 2 days ago with 3033 notes

twinkleofafadingstar:

so Charlotte Bronte read Emma by Jane Austen and was really interested in this minor character named Jane Fairfax who was poor and would have been a governess had she not married well and then Bronte wrote her own novel exploring the plight of the poor governess who married this guy named Edward Fairfax Rochester in a novel called Jane Eyre and my point is don’t let anyone tell you shit about fanfiction.

TIL

(via literatureismyutopia)

— 3 days ago with 58158 notes

bookpillows:

To celebrate my 300 followers, I am doing a book giveaway!

Here are the rules:

  • Only reblogs count. You can reblog as much as you want but don’t spam your followers
  • You must be following bookpillows. (This giveaway is about thanking my followers after all)
  • No giveaway blogs!
  • You must be willing to give me your address. I promise this information will be kept confidential and secure.
  • Your ask box must be open so that I can contact you if you win. If you do not reply within 24 hours I will move on to the next winner.
  • Three winners will each pick One book. The winners will be chosen through a random number generator.
  • The winners will be able to chose any of the books listed above.
  • This is an international giveaway, but I will be using the book depository, so make sure your country is listed on their page.
  • This giveaway ends on May 3, 2014.
  • If you have any questions direct them here.

(via bookpillows)

— 3 days ago with 540 notes
Anonymous asked: Do you know any good literature blogs?


Answer:

This list is by now means complete and I’m sure I’m missing some of my favorite blogs on here, but here are some blogs that popped up in my mind when I read your question:

thegirlandherbooks
bookpillows
theheroinenextdoor
booksandghosts
bookporn
literatureismyutopia
susanandherbooks
goldencages
theonewholovesbooks

— 4 days ago with 1 note
#thegirlandherbooks  #bookpillows  #theheroinenextdoor  #booksandghosts  #bookporn  #literatureismyutopia  #susanandherbooks  #goldencages  #theonewholovesbooks 
Anonymous asked: hey you know what happened to circumstanceanddisposition? katie, i believe was her name? i really enjoyed her writing and i was so dismayed when i did see her writing pop up my dash.


Answer:

I remember circumstanceanddisposition and I talked to her a couple of times but I don’t know what’s happened to her and her blog. I tried looking her up and it seems as if her blog’s been deleted. Does anyone have any information about what happened to the blog?

— 4 days ago
14 daunting books every man must read →

(Source: athousandbookstoread, via bookpillows)

— 6 days ago with 53 notes
"Do you realize that all great literature is all about what a bummer it is to be a human being? Isn’t it such a relief to have somebody say that?"
Kurt Vonnegut (via the22ndpilot)

(via bookpillows)

— 6 days ago with 3076 notes
Gabriel García Márquez, 1927 - 2014 →

nyrbclassics:

image

The Colombian novelist Alvaro Mutis used to tell a story about his close friend and compatriot Gabriel García Márquez, who has died aged 87. In the mid-Sixties, when the latter was writing One Hundred Years of Solitude (1967), they met every evening for a drink. García Márquez would tell…

(via nouvellabooks)

— 6 days ago with 163 notes