The Literary Snob

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"A classic is a book that has never finished saying what it has to say." Italo Calvino

Read the Printed Word!

lucy-or-something:

piinboots:

sickhypnotik:

his wife said she’d divorce him if he killed Arya

his wife said she’d divorce him if he killed Arya

GOOD

^

(Source: katzbeverly, via themastermarauder)

— 2 weeks ago with 56120 notes
Could Mr Darcy afford a stately home today? - Telegraph →

aisforausten:

Really interesting article on how Austen characters’ incomes would translate into today’s money. Turns out Captain Wentworth and Anne Elliot would be like some kind of regency power-couple, with a combined fortune giving them £25m worth of prestige value!

(via fuckyeahjaneausten)

— 2 weeks ago with 81 notes
"The purpose of a storyteller is not to tell you how to think, but to give you questions to think upon. Too often, we forget that."
Brandon Sanderson in The Way of Kings
— 2 weeks ago with 37 notes
litteraturesouscouverture:

Norwegian Wood - Haruki Murakami / Bloomsbury
Cover and illustration by Celia Arellano

litteraturesouscouverture:

Norwegian Wood - Haruki Murakami / Bloomsbury

Cover and illustration by Celia Arellano

(via paygeturner)

— 2 weeks ago with 99 notes
"The idea that sex is something a woman gives a man, and she loses something when she does that, which again for me is nonsense. I want us to raise girls differently where boys and girls start to see sexuality as something that they own, rather than something that a boy takes from a girl."
Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (NPR)

(Source: try-so-to-live, via hoomanao)

— 2 weeks ago with 80593 notes

by rosewong:

Secret Garden, The Great Gatsby, Frankenstein, 1984, Lolita, The Princess and the Goblin, Moby Dick ’ Rose Wong

ink and digital

Book Cover designs for my final Senior thesis! 

Super excited to do more illustrated type design stuff~*~*~

(via bookporn)

— 4 weeks ago with 3351 notes
Gone Girl Book Review

                   

Publisher Summary: On a warm summer morning in North Carthage, Missouri, it is Nick and Amy Dunne’s fifth wedding anniversary. Presents are being wrapped and reservations are being made when Nick’s clever and beautiful wife disappears. Husband-of-the-Year Nick isn’t doing himself any favors with cringe-worthy daydreams about the slope and shape of his wife’s head, but passages from Amy’s diary reveal the alpha-girl perfectionist could have put anyone dangerously on edge. Under mounting pressure from the police and the media—as well as Amy’s fiercely doting parents—the town golden boy parades an endless series of lies, deceits, and inappropriate behavior. Nick is oddly evasive, and he’s definitely bitter—but is he really a killer?

Review

Gone Girl blew me away. I came into the book expecting a decent crime novel if not a tad predictable. For some unplanned reason this year I’ve been reading a lot of crime novels. And the thing is I don’t love crime novels. In general I find them formulaic with cookie-cutter characters. But I was talking to my best friend/cousin and I asked her for a book recommendation. She came up with Gone Girl and told me I wasn’t going to regret it. And you know what she was right.

My expectations where dead off on this one. Instead of a crime novel I found a psychologically twisted portrait of relationships gone wrong. The beginning played out like a brilliant modern re-interpretation of Rashomon. Every stage of the book was well thought-out and the author does an amazing job herding the readers through the book. She purposely manipulates the readers the way our current 24-hour news media does in our everyday lives. She also uses the novel to explore themes of relationships and human nature which are incisive and poignant.  

This book is dark, but it’s not creepy. It’s cynical to the core, and I loved every minute of it. I highly recommend this novel. 5/5 stars

— 1 month ago with 7 notes
#gonegirl  #bookreview 
"Reading is a bit like hallucinating."
Nathan Filer, The Shock of The Fall (via spaceganda1f)

(Source: quotethat, via booksandghosts)

— 1 month ago with 7674 notes

" You hear nothing but truth from me.—I have blamed you, and lectured you, and you have borne it as no other woman in England would have borne it.—Bear with the truths I would tell you now, dearest Emma, as well as you have borne with them. The manner, perhaps, may have as little to recommend them. God knows, I have been a very indifferent lover.—But you understand me.—Yes, you see, you understand my feelings—and will return them if you can. At present, I ask only to hear, once to hear your voice."

"If I loved you less, I might be able to talk about it more."

That line right there is one of the top reasons why Mr. Knightley is my favorite Austen man.

(Source: in-the-land-of-gods-and-monsters, via fuckyeahjaneausten)

— 1 month ago with 729 notes
ibrandster:

i think of this whenever i buy anything over $10

This is me after I go on a book buying binge.

ibrandster:

i think of this whenever i buy anything over $10

This is me after I go on a book buying binge.

(Source: maraghsummer, via thelifeofabibliophile)

— 1 month ago with 294545 notes